“Tail Questions”

This month’s blog is about tail questions. I always pick a topic to write about based on student reactions in the classroom. If I find that some students find certain things difficult to understand, then I write about them in the blog. Tail questions are sometimes difficult for some students. A tail question is basically …

“The Different Types of Nouns”

In the beginning, it is said, was the word (to paraphrase a biblical line). If so, that word – whatever it may have been – soon multiplied exponentially. Presently, words begat phrases; phrases begat clauses; clauses, eventually, begat sentences. Before long, homo sapiens was able to engage in phatic discourse; a few thousand years later …

“Cockney Rhyming Slang”

You may encounter Cockney Rhyming Slang and its many variations mainly in England and Australia. It is not very common in the US. The origins of this form of the language dates back to the early 19th century. It was originally used by traders so they could talk to each other without their customers understanding …

‘Synecdoche’ and ‘Metonymy’

‘Synecdoche’ and ‘metonymy’ are not words that one often hears. Yet we are presented with examples of both of these intriguing literary devices on a regular basis. Synecdoche is the use of part of a thing to represent its whole or, conversely, using a whole to represent a constituent part. The former is called ‘microcosmic …

Uses of the word “wish”

In this week’s blog post, we’re going to take a look at the verb “to wish.” It’s an important word, as it has several uses, so it’s key that we know how to use it correctly. Let’s jump right in.   We use the verb “wish” to express that we want things to be different …

“The Articles in English”

Let’s get started with a general review of the articles in English. There are three of them: “a,” “an” and “the.” The most basic distinction is between the indefinite articles (“a” and “an”) and the definite article (“the”). We use “a” before a consonant sound, and “an” before a vowel sound. Both of them are …

“The Many Uses of the word Settle”

{headtag:customtag}{/headtag} Download Exercise There are many uses of the word settle in English and we will have a look at a few of them here today. Some of them have very similar uses, but they are just used a slightly different context which gives them a slightly different meaning. But let’s have a look at …

“The Phrasal Verbs”

{headtag:customtag}{/headtag} Download Exercise As we saw in this week’s Tip of the Week, we’re looking at something that tends to strike fear into the hearts of English students- phrasal verbs. But the phrasal verbs we’re going to go over share a common theme: they all mean ‘to continue.’ Without further ado, let’s jump right in. …

“The Present Perfect Tense”

We use the present perfect tense when the action is finished but the time is not finished. For example, if we say “he has played football this week”, it means that he isn’t playing football now, but he did play it at some time this week. The action is finished but this week is still …

“Common Idioms – Episode VII – The Idiom Awakens”

{headtag:customtag}{/headtag} Download Exercise Over the past few months we have been looking at many different idioms and to be honest we have barely scratched the surface. English is full of common sayings and idioms that can be very confusing for the average language learner, but once they have been learnt and interpreted, they can be …