Adjectius i Adverbis en Anglès


Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Adjectives are words that describe nouns. When it comes to the positioning of adjectives in a sentence, they go in front of nouns. For example, in the sentence “I have two black cars,” the word ‘black’ is an adjective, and it describes the noun ‘cars.’ Some examples of adjectives …

Els pronom indefinits en anglès


Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3   En anglès per fer referència a una quantitat indeterminada o indefinida de coses fem servir some i any, es a dir, alguns/unes, tot i que en català molts cops no es tradueixen. Any es fa servir en preguntes i frases negatives, i some en frases afirmatives. Per exemple, …

“Quantifiers”


Stage 1 Stage 2 This week’s blog is about the words ‘many’ and ‘much’ and ‘few’ and ‘little’. These words often cause confusion because a lot of students have difficulty remembering when to use one or the other.
We use ‘many’ and ‘few’ for things we can count, such as tables, chairs, people etc… We use …

“The Present Simple and The Present Continuous” (Part Two)


This week’s blog is dealing with one of the most common mistakes that English learners make: the difference between the present simple and the present continuous. These tenses are often confused and used in place of each other.   I suppose the reason the two are mistaken for each other is that they are similar …

“How To Translate The Verb ‘Tener’ In English”


-I have seven brothers and two sisters. -He has no idea that we’re planning a surprise party for him. -We had to tell her not to bring her cat to work. (past tense) Notice that all of the above examples feature positive sentences. When making questions and negative sentences with the verb ‘have,’ we need …

“Present Simple and Present Continuous Tenses”


I suppose the reason the two are mistaken for each other is that they are similar in sound when speaking. I often hear students saying “I am speak” or “I speaking” etc. Apart from using the wrong tense, students often use the wrong structure. In this blog I am going to go through the important …

“Prepositions for Days and Times”


When we talk about a specific time of the clock or the calendar – for example 5pm or Easter – we use the preposition ‘at’, e.g. ‘I have an appointment at 5pm,’; ‘the meeting finished at 10am’, and so on. To answer the question we asked on Facebook – should we say ‘I’ll see you …

“Prepositions of Time”


There are two common ways of telling the time: (a) using ‘past’ and ‘to’ or (b) giving hours, then minutes. (a) If we use ‘past’ and ‘to’, we normally use increments of five minutes. Let’s use the example of two o’clock (‘o’clock’ means ‘of the clock’): 2.00 – two o’clock 2.05 – five (minutes) past …

“Possessive Adjectives vs. Possessive Pronouns”


We put a possessive adjective before a noun, just like another other adjective. As a reminder, the possessive adjectives are: -my, your, his, her, its, our, your (plural), their So let’s see some possessive adjectives in action: ~Hey, that’s my coat! ~I don’t know where your book is. ~Our cars are parked outside. Download Exercise …