“The Verbs Lie, Lie and Lay”


The regular verb ‘lie’ The regular verb ‘to lie’ means ‘to not tell the truth’, and as it’s regular, the paradigm is simple – ‘lie, lied, lied’. This is the verb which is the least easy to confuse, naturally, as it’s regular and is totally different in meaning to the other two spookily similar verbs, …

“Forming The Passive Voice”


We use the passive voice when the subject in the sentence receives the action, as opposed to the active voice, when the subject does the action. It is called the ‘passive voice’ because the subject is not active, therefore it is not doing the action. We form the passive voice by using the verb ‘to …

“How to use Who and Whom”


There’s no questioning that ‘who’ is the more commonly used of the two, especially in questions. For example: ~Who is your favorite writer? ~Who left the light on? However, consider the following questions: ~To whom are we sending the letter? ~Whom will she invite to the party? Why do we use whom in these questions? …

“Idioms”


It is estimated there are about 25,000 idioms in the English language. Before you decide to give up on your quest to learn them, remember that not all of these will be frequent in day to day use, and many will be hugely outdated – just the same as vocabulary. The average person on the …

“Prepositions of Time”


There are two common ways of telling the time: (a) using ‘past’ and ‘to’ or (b) giving hours, then minutes. (a) If we use ‘past’ and ‘to’, we normally use increments of five minutes. Let’s use the example of two o’clock (‘o’clock’ means ‘of the clock’): 2.00 – two o’clock 2.05 – five (minutes) past …

“Short Answers”


There are other ways that we can make our answers shorter. In normal spoken English, we often use these short answers because it is easier than giving a complete sentence and it is more natural. When you are learning a language it is better to practise with full sentences because you need to learn how …

“Adverbs”


First, we’ll look at adverbs of frequency. Some common examples are: sometimes, often, usually, never, always, occasionally…the list goes on and on! These adverbs normally go after the first auxiliary verb (if there is one in the sentence). For example: ~He can always hit that note when he sings. ~She has never been to Moscow. …

“Easily Confused Words”


ACCEPT/EXCEPT Accept = to agree to do, to agree to receive Except = not including This is one of the pairs where in writing the mistake rarely happens – but when speaking, it may sound like a native speaker might be saying something like ‘Everyone accept me went for a drink after work.’ Sometimes, they …

“The Correct Order of Adjectives”


Using adjectives can be difficult – there are guidelines to follow. In English, most adjectives go before the nouns they describe. For example, ‘the big dog’; ‘the blue chair’; ‘the sad clown’; ‘the happy student’; and so on. Of course it is often necessary to use more than one adjective to describe a noun. This …

“The Conditional Tenses”


We use the ‘Zero Conditional’ to talk about things that are generally true. Its construction is “If + Present + Present or Imperative”. For example “If it rains, I take an umbrella.” Or, “If you come home late, be quiet.” Notice that the first example communicates something that is generally true and the second communicates …