“The Passive Voice”

Let’s look at a sentence in the active voice: ~Hank wrote the script. In the active voice, the subject does the action. Hank, the subject, does the action to the object, the script. Now let’s look at that same sentence in the passive voice: ~The script was written by Hank. Now the script is the …

“Homophones”

Read aloud, you won’t hear any problems with that sentence using any of the options, but only one choice is correct in each case. ‘They’re’ is a contraction of ‘they are’. It usually is followed by an adjective, or a verb ending in ‘ing’ (present continuous form). This is a way you can see if …

“An Evolving Language”

However this can be difficult, even with subtitles. English vocabulary evolves and expands at an incredible rate – new words (known as ‘neologisms’) are created all the time, as our lives change due to new technology and lifestyle choices. Indeed, new technology is responsible for many new English words: for example, the verb ‘to unfriend’, …

“Possessive Adjectives vs. Possessive Pronouns”

We put a possessive adjective before a noun, just like another other adjective. As a reminder, the possessive adjectives are: -my, your, his, her, its, our, your (plural), their So let’s see some possessive adjectives in action: ~Hey, that’s my coat! ~I don’t know where your book is. ~Our cars are parked outside. Let’s take …

“Writing a letter in English”

When writing a letter, the sender’s address always goes in the top right-hand corner of the page. For an email this is not necessary. Underneath our address, we put the date in full form. This means we don’t write ‘3/05/2015’, but ‘3rd May 2015’. On the other side of the page, we put the recipient’s …

‘Bored’ or ‘Boring’?

If we say that someone is ‘bored’, it means that their mood is one of boredom – they are not stimulated by what is happening (‘I’m so bored today, I need to do something different’). If we say someone is ‘boring’, however, the sentence takes on a much more personal, critical tone. This describes the …

“The Present Perfect”

There are different ways to explain when we use the present perfect tense. We can use it when an action is finished but the time is not finished. For example, “I have played tennis this week”. In this example we we are not playing tennis now, but this week is still in progress, so we …

“Commonly Misused Words”

The next pair of words we’ll look at is ‘anymore’ and ‘any more.’ As one word, ‘anymore’ has a meaning related to time and is almost always used in negative sentences when referring to something that you no longer do or something that no longer happens. For example: ~ I don’t play basketball anymore. ~ …

Idioms and Colour

Black sheep – if you’re the black sheep of the family, you’re a member of the family who is in disgrace, or is felt to be worthless. Nowadays, it can also mean that you’re very different to the rest of your family, but that isn’t used as much as its other meaning. ‘After spending all …