“The Irish Expressions”


Let’s start with the most popular expression in Ireland; “what’s the craic?” This means “what is going on?” or “how is it going?”. The word ‘craic’ is Irish for ‘fun’ but we use it in this context to ask somebody how things are or what is happening. We generally use it to greet a person, …

“Suffixes”


There are two main types of morpheme in English: ‘free’ morphemes and ‘bound’ morphemes. ‘Free’ morphemes can be used on their own, in much the same way that a main clause makes sense on its own (whereas a subordinate/dependent clause does not). For example, the definite article ‘the’ is a morpheme as well as being …

“The Future Perfect and The Future Simple”


The first thing you should understand about the future perfect and future simple is their structures. To form the future simple we use the word ‘will’ followed by an infinitive without ‘to’. For example “I will go to the party tonight” or “You will have a class tomorrow”. This is pretty easy, isn´t it? We …

“The Correct Usage Of Punctuation”


For example, let’s take these two sentences: Let’s eat, Grandma! And Let’s eat Grandma! A simple, little comma can change this sentence from telling your Grandma to put food on the table to becoming a cannibal. The first sentence (with the comma) is simply an imperative telling Grandma that it is time to eat. The …

“Uses of the definite article”


The definite article ‘the’ is the most frequently occuring word in English. For this reason, it’s important to know when we should be using it, and when we shouldn’t. There are many uses of the definite article ‘the’ – and I’m sure you’d get bored reading if we listed them all on the same page …

“The Past Perfect”


–We use the Past Perfect when there are two actions in the past, with one happening before the other. Keeping this definition in mind, it’s important to note that it’s very common to use the Past Perfect together with the Past Simple (two actions in one sentence, two different verb tenses). Let’s take a look …

“Pronouns”


In English, verbs must always have either a noun or pronoun as the subject. This is very different from some other languages, where the more developed system of verb terminations means it is usually obvious who or what we are talking about from the form of the verb and we therefore don’t generally need any …

“How To Do Compositions”


When you are doing a composition you should plan it beforehand and then take your time when writing it. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is to rush through it and not pay enough attention to what you are writing. Remember that you are learning a new language and it is quite different …

“The many uses of get in phrasal verbs”


Take “get in” for example. We can use this as an imperative, such as a mother telling her child to get in out of the rain. Or maybe to tell someone to “get in” to a car. But it can also be used as a ‘prepositional’ verb meaning to gather in or to bring in …