“The many uses of get in phrasal verbs”


Take “get in” for example. We can use this as an imperative, such as a mother telling her child to get in out of the rain. Or maybe to tell someone to “get in” to a car. But it can also be used as a ‘prepositional’ verb meaning to gather in or to bring in …

“Present Perfect Continuous and Its Uses”


SUBJECT + HAVE/HAS + PRESENT PARTICIPLE (ING) So an example sentence would look like this: Lola has been working at this company for 6 years. Lola started working at the company 6 years ago, and is still working there now. However, we can also use the construction of the present perfect and say ‘Lola has …

“Modal Verbs”


I remember my first exposure to modal verbs: at primary school, whenever I asked the teacher ‘Can I go to the bathroom?’ the teacher would invariably reply ‘I don’t know. Can you?’ This was done to demonstrate that the polite way of making a request like this is to use the modal ‘may’, instead of …

“Present Simple and Present Continuous Tenses”


I suppose the reason the two are mistaken for each other is that they are similar in sound when speaking. I often hear students saying “I am speak” or “I speaking” etc. Apart from using the wrong tense, students often use the wrong structure. In this blog I am going to go through the important …

“The Importance of Prepositions”


Many English learners have trouble with prepositions. Using the incorrect preposition can completely change the context of a sentence and cause the speaker problems. So the correct use of prepositions is vitally important in English. For example, the difference between “to” and “at” in the context of throwing a ball could save your life. If …

“Emphasising Pronouns and Reflexive Pronouns”


Before I go into detail I should give you the full list. The words ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, himself’, ‘herself’, itself’, ‘oneself’, ‘ourselves’, ‘yourselves’ and ‘themselves’ are both emphasising pronouns and reflexive pronouns. Although we use the same words for both sets of pronouns, they are used in very different ways. Let us first talk about reflexive …

‘For’ vs. ‘Since’


~We use ‘for’ to talk about a period of time. So when you think of time phrases like “ten minutes” or “three months” or “a long time,” the necessary choice is ‘for.’ For example: “I’ve been studying English for five years.” ~We use ‘since’ to specify when a period of time began. This is the …

“Dealing With Common Mistakes”


A false friend is a word that sounds like or resembles another word in another language. For example, the Spanish word ‘codo’ means ‘elbow’ in English and the English word ‘code’ means ‘código’ in Spanish. It is easy to see how and why a person might confuse these words when speaking in their second language. …

“Determiners”


There are two main types of determiners: specific and general. Let’s look at specific determiners first. The definite article – ‘the’ – is a specific determiner. If we say ‘the table’, it is assumed that both the speaker and the listener know which table is being talked about. Demonstratives form another group of specific determiners: …

“Weather Idioms”


Think of the expression ‘snowed under’, for example. We don’t literally mean that someone is completely covered by snow, as if an avalanche has coated them. But the figurative meaning is easy to understand from this visualization. ‘Snowed under’, often used in a workplace, means that one has so much work to do and so …