‘Bring’ vs. ‘Take’


The verb ‘bring’ means ‘carry here.’ For example, you can tell someone: ‘bring me the book, please.’ If, at the time of speaking, you’re at work, you can say: ‘I forgot to bring my lunch to the office today!’ Again, the important thing to note is that when you said the above sentence, you were …

“Time Expressions”


Punctuality – being ‘on time’ – is, of course, very important in all areas of life. We should be on time for work, appointments, meetings with friends, and so on. The expression ‘on time’ means to not be late: to reach a place (or do something) at the right moment. For example, students should always …

‘So’ and its many uses


Look at this sentence: “It was raining, so I took my umbrella and wore a raincoat”. In this sentence the word so means “therefore” or “consequently”. Rather than using the words therefore or consequently, we can use the word so. Another example of this is in the sentence “I failed my exam, so I have …

“Homophones (Part Two)”


Here are some common words that are often mistaken for each other when either spoken or written.   STATIONARY and STATIONERY We use stationary for something that is not moving and we use stationery for writing materials.   YOKE and YOLK We use yoke for a wooden crosspiece to harness a pair of oxen together …

“How To Translate The Verb ‘Tener’ In English”


-I have seven brothers and two sisters. -He has no idea that we’re planning a surprise party for him. -We had to tell her not to bring her cat to work. (past tense) Notice that all of the above examples feature positive sentences. When making questions and negative sentences with the verb ‘have,’ we need …

“Words And Phrases For Money”


Let’s start with some vocabulary. In the UK, a pound is called a ‘quid’. ‘Have you got a quid?’ means ‘Have you got a pound?’ Note that we don’t pluralise this noun when talking about an amount of money, i.e. we say ’50 quid’ and not ’50 quids’. However we do use ‘quids’ in the …

“Verb + Gerund or Infinitive?”


Let’s try some verbs followed by gerunds. 1. AVOID We should avoid eating fatty foods. You had to avoid hitting the car with his bike.   2. DISLIKE I dislike watching boring movies. A boxer dislikes losing a fight. Download Exercise   3. MENTION The teacher mentioned seeing me on the weekend   4. POSTPONE …

“The Irish Expressions”


Let’s start with the most popular expression in Ireland; “what’s the craic?” This means “what is going on?” or “how is it going?”. The word ‘craic’ is Irish for ‘fun’ but we use it in this context to ask somebody how things are or what is happening. We generally use it to greet a person, …

“Suffixes”


There are two main types of morpheme in English: ‘free’ morphemes and ‘bound’ morphemes. ‘Free’ morphemes can be used on their own, in much the same way that a main clause makes sense on its own (whereas a subordinate/dependent clause does not). For example, the definite article ‘the’ is a morpheme as well as being …