“The Irish Expressions”


Let’s start with the most popular expression in Ireland; “what’s the craic?” This means “what is going on?” or “how is it going?”. The word ‘craic’ is Irish for ‘fun’ but we use it in this context to ask somebody how things are or what is happening. We generally use it to greet a person, …

“Suffixes”


There are two main types of morpheme in English: ‘free’ morphemes and ‘bound’ morphemes. ‘Free’ morphemes can be used on their own, in much the same way that a main clause makes sense on its own (whereas a subordinate/dependent clause does not). For example, the definite article ‘the’ is a morpheme as well as being …

“How To Do Compositions”


When you are doing a composition you should plan it beforehand and then take your time when writing it. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is to rush through it and not pay enough attention to what you are writing. Remember that you are learning a new language and it is quite different …

“The many uses of get in phrasal verbs”


Take “get in” for example. We can use this as an imperative, such as a mother telling her child to get in out of the rain. Or maybe to tell someone to “get in” to a car. But it can also be used as a ‘prepositional’ verb meaning to gather in or to bring in …

“Dealing With Common Mistakes”


A false friend is a word that sounds like or resembles another word in another language. For example, the Spanish word ‘codo’ means ‘elbow’ in English and the English word ‘code’ means ‘código’ in Spanish. It is easy to see how and why a person might confuse these words when speaking in their second language. …

“Easily Confused Words”


ACCEPT/EXCEPT Accept = to agree to do, to agree to receive Except = not including This is one of the pairs where in writing the mistake rarely happens – but when speaking, it may sound like a native speaker might be saying something like ‘Everyone accept me went for a drink after work.’ Sometimes, they …

“The Correct Order of Adjectives”


Using adjectives can be difficult – there are guidelines to follow. In English, most adjectives go before the nouns they describe. For example, ‘the big dog’; ‘the blue chair’; ‘the sad clown’; ‘the happy student’; and so on. Of course it is often necessary to use more than one adjective to describe a noun. This …

“An Evolving Language”


However this can be difficult, even with subtitles. English vocabulary evolves and expands at an incredible rate – new words (known as ‘neologisms’) are created all the time, as our lives change due to new technology and lifestyle choices. Indeed, new technology is responsible for many new English words: for example, the verb ‘to unfriend’, …