“Prepositions for Days and Times”


When we talk about a specific time of the clock or the calendar – for example 5pm or Easter – we use the preposition ‘at’, e.g. ‘I have an appointment at 5pm,’; ‘the meeting finished at 10am’, and so on. To answer the question we asked on Facebook – should we say ‘I’ll see you …

“Prepositions of Time”


There are two common ways of telling the time: (a) using ‘past’ and ‘to’ or (b) giving hours, then minutes. (a) If we use ‘past’ and ‘to’, we normally use increments of five minutes. Let’s use the example of two o’clock (‘o’clock’ means ‘of the clock’): 2.00 – two o’clock 2.05 – five (minutes) past …

“The Conditional Tenses”


We use the ‘Zero Conditional’ to talk about things that are generally true. Its construction is “If + Present + Present or Imperative”. For example “If it rains, I take an umbrella.” Or, “If you come home late, be quiet.” Notice that the first example communicates something that is generally true and the second communicates …

“Homophones”


Read aloud, you won’t hear any problems with that sentence using any of the options, but only one choice is correct in each case. ‘They’re’ is a contraction of ‘they are’. It usually is followed by an adjective, or a verb ending in ‘ing’ (present continuous form). This is a way you can see if …

‘Bored’ or ‘Boring’?


If we say that someone is ‘bored’, it means that their mood is one of boredom – they are not stimulated by what is happening (‘I’m so bored today, I need to do something different’). If we say someone is ‘boring’, however, the sentence takes on a much more personal, critical tone. This describes the …

“The Present Perfect”


There are different ways to explain when we use the present perfect tense. We can use it when an action is finished but the time is not finished. For example, “I have played tennis this week”. In this example we we are not playing tennis now, but this week is still in progress, so we …