“The Future Perfect and The Future Simple”


The first thing you should understand about the future perfect and future simple is their structures. To form the future simple we use the word ‘will’ followed by an infinitive without ‘to’. For example “I will go to the party tonight” or “You will have a class tomorrow”. This is pretty easy, isn´t it? We …

“The Past Perfect”


–We use the Past Perfect when there are two actions in the past, with one happening before the other. Keeping this definition in mind, it’s important to note that it’s very common to use the Past Perfect together with the Past Simple (two actions in one sentence, two different verb tenses). Let’s take a look …

“Pronouns”


Stage 6 Stage 7 Stage 8 Pronouns are little words that serve a very important function. A pronoun is a word that can stand in place of a noun. For example, in the sentence, ‘When I met Jane, she was working at a café in Covent Garden’, the word ‘she’ stands for the proper noun …

“How To Do Compositions”


When you are doing a composition you should plan it beforehand and then take your time when writing it. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is to rush through it and not pay enough attention to what you are writing. Remember that you are learning a new language and it is quite different …

“Present Perfect Continuous and Its Uses”


SUBJECT + HAVE/HAS + PRESENT PARTICIPLE (ING) So an example sentence would look like this: Lola has been working at this company for 6 years. Lola started working at the company 6 years ago, and is still working there now. However, we can also use the construction of the present perfect and say ‘Lola has …

“Modal Verbs”


I remember my first exposure to modal verbs: at primary school, whenever I asked the teacher ‘Can I go to the bathroom?’ the teacher would invariably reply ‘I don’t know. Can you?’ This was done to demonstrate that the polite way of making a request like this is to use the modal ‘may’, instead of …

‘For’ vs. ‘Since’


As mentioned in this week’s Tip of the Week, we’ll be going over a couple words that can cause confusion for English learners- ‘for’ and ‘since.’ Let’s start with a basic difference by defining each word: ~We use ‘for’ to talk about a period of time. So when you think of time phrases like “ten …

“The Active Voice and the Passive Voice”


Before we go on, let’s take a step back and look at what we’re dealing with here. The Active Voice communicates that the subject does the action, while the Passive Voice communicates that the subject receives the action. We form the Passive Voice by using the verb ‘to be’ and a past participle. For example: …