‘Synecdoche’ and ‘Metonymy’


Stage 11 Stage 12 Stage 13 ‘Synecdoche’ and ‘metonymy’ are not words that one often hears. Yet we are presented with examples of both of these intriguing literary devices on a regular basis. Synecdoche is the use of part of a thing to represent its whole or, conversely, using a whole to represent a constituent …

«The Irish Expressions»


Let’s start with the most popular expression in Ireland; «what’s the craic?» This means «what is going on?» or «how is it going?». The word ‘craic’ is Irish for ‘fun’ but we use it in this context to ask somebody how things are or what is happening. We generally use it to greet a person, …

«How To Do Compositions»


When you are doing a composition you should plan it beforehand and then take your time when writing it. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is to rush through it and not pay enough attention to what you are writing. Remember that you are learning a new language and it is quite different …

«The Correct Order of Adjectives»


Using adjectives can be difficult – there are guidelines to follow. In English, most adjectives go before the nouns they describe. For example, ‘the big dog’; ‘the blue chair’; ‘the sad clown’; ‘the happy student’; and so on. Of course it is often necessary to use more than one adjective to describe a noun. This …

«An Evolving Language»


However this can be difficult, even with subtitles. English vocabulary evolves and expands at an incredible rate – new words (known as ‘neologisms’) are created all the time, as our lives change due to new technology and lifestyle choices. Indeed, new technology is responsible for many new English words: for example, the verb ‘to unfriend’, …