«Determiners»


There are two main types of determiners: specific and general. Let’s look at specific determiners first. The definite article – ‘the’ – is a specific determiner. If we say ‘the table’, it is assumed that both the speaker and the listener know which table is being talked about. Demonstratives form another group of specific determiners: …

«Prepositions for Days and Times»


When we talk about a specific time of the clock or the calendar – for example 5pm or Easter – we use the preposition ‘at’, e.g. ‘I have an appointment at 5pm,’; ‘the meeting finished at 10am’, and so on. To answer the question we asked on Facebook – should we say ‘I’ll see you …

«Prepositions of Time»


There are two common ways of telling the time: (a) using ‘past’ and ‘to’ or (b) giving hours, then minutes. (a) If we use ‘past’ and ‘to’, we normally use increments of five minutes. Let’s use the example of two o’clock (‘o’clock’ means ‘of the clock’): 2.00 – two o’clock 2.05 – five (minutes) past …

«Homophones»


Stage 3 Stage 4   Homophones: Words That Are Pronounced The Same But Spelt Differently   En el artículo de hoy os vamos a hablar de los homófonos en inglés, esas palabras que se pronuncian igual pero su grafía y significado son diferentes. Sabemos que los homófonos suelen generar muchas confusiones, por eso es importante …

«Possessive Adjectives vs. Possessive Pronouns»


We put a possessive adjective before a noun, just like another other adjective. As a reminder, the possessive adjectives are: -my, your, his, her, its, our, your (plural), their So let’s see some possessive adjectives in action: ~Hey, that’s my coat! ~I don’t know where your book is. ~Our cars are parked outside. Download Exercise …