“The Importance of Prepositions”


Many English learners have trouble with prepositions. Using the incorrect preposition can completely change the context of a sentence and cause the speaker problems. So the correct use of prepositions is vitally important in English. For example, the difference between “to” and “at” in the context of throwing a ball could save your life. If …

“Emphasising Pronouns and Reflexive Pronouns”


Before I go into detail I should give you the full list. The words ‘myself’, ‘yourself’, himself’, ‘herself’, itself’, ‘oneself’, ‘ourselves’, ‘yourselves’ and ‘themselves’ are both emphasising pronouns and reflexive pronouns. Although we use the same words for both sets of pronouns, they are used in very different ways. Let us first talk about reflexive …

‘For’ vs. ‘Since’


As mentioned in this week’s Tip of the Week, we’ll be going over a couple words that can cause confusion for English learners- ‘for’ and ‘since.’ Let’s start with a basic difference by defining each word: ~We use ‘for’ to talk about a period of time. So when you think of time phrases like “ten …

“Dealing With Common Mistakes”


Stage 9 Stage 10 Stage 11 This week´s blog is about common mistakes. When we are learning a new language we are bound to make a lot of mistakes, but this will happen less frequently as we progress in our studies. One of the biggest mistakes that people make is using false friends in a …

“Determiners”


There are two main types of determiners: specific and general. Let’s look at specific determiners first. The definite article – ‘the’ – is a specific determiner. If we say ‘the table’, it is assumed that both the speaker and the listener know which table is being talked about. Demonstratives form another group of specific determiners: …

“Weather Idioms”


Think of the expression ‘snowed under’, for example. We don’t literally mean that someone is completely covered by snow, as if an avalanche has coated them. But the figurative meaning is easy to understand from this visualization. ‘Snowed under’, often used in a workplace, means that one has so much work to do and so …

“The Active Voice and the Passive Voice”


Before we go on, let’s take a step back and look at what we’re dealing with here. The Active Voice communicates that the subject does the action, while the Passive Voice communicates that the subject receives the action. We form the Passive Voice by using the verb ‘to be’ and a past participle. For example: …

“Prepositions for Days and Times”


When we talk about a specific time of the clock or the calendar – for example 5pm or Easter – we use the preposition ‘at’, e.g. ‘I have an appointment at 5pm,’; ‘the meeting finished at 10am’, and so on. To answer the question we asked on Facebook – should we say ‘I’ll see you …

“The Verbs Lie, Lie and Lay”


The regular verb ‘lie’ The regular verb ‘to lie’ means ‘to not tell the truth’, and as it’s regular, the paradigm is simple – ‘lie, lied, lied’. This is the verb which is the least easy to confuse, naturally, as it’s regular and is totally different in meaning to the other two spookily similar verbs, …

“Forming The Passive Voice”


We use the passive voice when the subject in the sentence receives the action, as opposed to the active voice, when the subject does the action. It is called the ‘passive voice’ because the subject is not active, therefore it is not doing the action. We form the passive voice by using the verb ‘to …