“Easily Confused Words”


ACCEPT/EXCEPT Accept = to agree to do, to agree to receive Except = not including This is one of the pairs where in writing the mistake rarely happens – but when speaking, it may sound like a native speaker might be saying something like ‘Everyone accept me went for a drink after work.’ Sometimes, they …

“The Correct Order of Adjectives”


Using adjectives can be difficult – there are guidelines to follow. In English, most adjectives go before the nouns they describe. For example, ‘the big dog’; ‘the blue chair’; ‘the sad clown’; ‘the happy student’; and so on. Of course it is often necessary to use more than one adjective to describe a noun. This …

“The Conditional Tenses”


We use the ‘Zero Conditional’ to talk about things that are generally true. Its construction is “If + Present + Present or Imperative”. For example “If it rains, I take an umbrella.” Or, “If you come home late, be quiet.” Notice that the first example communicates something that is generally true and the second communicates …

“The Passive Voice”


Let’s look at a sentence in the active voice: ~Hank wrote the script. In the active voice, the subject does the action. Hank, the subject, does the action to the object, the script. Now let’s look at that same sentence in the passive voice: ~The script was written by Hank. Now the script is the …

“Homophones”


Stage 3 Stage 4   Homophones: Words That Are Pronounced The Same But Spelt Differently   En el artículo de hoy os vamos a hablar de los homófonos en inglés, esas palabras que se pronuncian igual pero su grafía y significado son diferentes. Sabemos que los homófonos suelen generar muchas confusiones, por eso es importante …

“An Evolving Language”


Stage 11 Stage 12 Stage 13   We all like learning new words. The process of acquiring new vocabulary helps us to communicate more efficiently, making our lives easier and more fulfilling. Watching TV is a fun way of picking up new English vocabulary, as many of us grow up watching British and American TV …

“Possessive Adjectives vs. Possessive Pronouns”


We put a possessive adjective before a noun, just like another other adjective. As a reminder, the possessive adjectives are: -my, your, his, her, its, our, your (plural), their So let’s see some possessive adjectives in action: ~Hey, that’s my coat! ~I don’t know where your book is. ~Our cars are parked outside. Download Exercise …

“Writing a letter in English”


When writing a letter, the sender’s address always goes in the top right-hand corner of the page. For an email this is not necessary. Underneath our address, we put the date in full form. This means we don’t write ‘3/05/2015’, but ‘3rd May 2015’. On the other side of the page, we put the recipient’s …

‘Bored’ or ‘Boring’?


If we say that someone is ‘bored’, it means that their mood is one of boredom – they are not stimulated by what is happening (‘I’m so bored today, I need to do something different’). If we say someone is ‘boring’, however, the sentence takes on a much more personal, critical tone. This describes the …

“The Present Perfect”


There are different ways to explain when we use the present perfect tense. We can use it when an action is finished but the time is not finished. For example, “I have played tennis this week”. In this example we we are not playing tennis now, but this week is still in progress, so we …