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The meaning of the words any and some is “algunos/as”, but we use any in questions and negative sentences, and some in positive sentences. For example, we say:

~ «Are there any books on the table?», «Yes, there are some books on the table»
~ «Are there any books on the floor?», «No, there aren’t any books on the floor».

 

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We use any in a non-specific question, when the number is not important. For example:
~ «Are there año books on the table?», «Yes, there are some books on the table”, o “No, there are not año books on the table»

If the number is important, we use “How many” and there is a specific answer: “one”, “two”, “three”. etc., o “none”.

Both anybody and somebody mean “alguien”. We use anybody in questions and negative sentences, and somebody in positive sentences. For example, we say:

~ «Is there Anybody sitting here?” “Yes, there is somebody sitting here»
~ «Is there Anybody sitting there?», «No, there is not Anybody sitting there»

 
«Anybody» is non-specific and has a non-specific answer, whereas “who” is specific and has a specific answer: “Mrs. Smith», «Mr. Smith», etc., or «nobody».

Anything and Something both mean the same thing. We use anything in questions and negative sentences, and we use something in positive sentences. For example, we say:

~ «Have I got anything in my right hand?» «Yes, you have got something in your right hand»
~ «Have I got anything in my left hand?» «No, you have not got anything in your left hand»

 
Anything we use in a non-specific question, whereas “What?” is specific and has a specific answer: “a light», «a book», etc, or «nothing».

 
J. Crowley
 

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